On dreaming crazy dreams and making them realities

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We were all created to create something amazing.

We all have the potential to become artists, pilgrims, pioneers, visionaries, revolutionaries and world-changers.   This power isn’t just in some of us: it’s a Divine gift that’s been granted to every single soul.

We all have that Light burning within us, but most of the time, we hide it.  It’s too scary to shine that brightly.

Whatever it is that we’re dreaming of… we tell ourselves it’s crazy, or too weird, or too ‘out there’, or it’ll never work.

Or we kid ourselves we’re too small, too unknown, too young, too old, too short, too tall, too fat, too thin, too dumb, or too unknown to make it work.

Or we insist we don’t have the right education, the right training, the right skills, the right background, the right contacts, the right car, the right shoes, or the right handbag.

What I loved about Tanzania in 1999 was that none of that stuff mattered.

I was part of a group of 19-22 year olds with a dream of building a Peace Village – a place where young people from all over the world could come to learn about African music, culture and wellness traditions.  We didn’t let anyone tell us we couldn’t do it.  We raised money, bought a plot of land, registered our own arts and culture organisation, and started building huts.

It got burnt down, so we adjusted the dream, grew the big crazy vision even bigger and crazier, and started again.

You can’t build that there, people told us.  Whatever are you thinking of?  You’re insane. 

It’s a barren patch of bushland.  There’s no infrastructure.  There’s no water.  There’s no electricity.

What you’re trying to do has never been done before.  There’s no path.

So we created the path by walking it.

Within five years, we had our place where young people from all over the world could come to learn about African music, culture and wellness traditions.   But it wasn’t just a Peace Village.  It was the beginning of a secondary school for underprivileged youth.

Those aren’t classrooms, officials told us.  An octagonal timber-frame building can’t be a classroom.  Classrooms are rectangular and built from concrete blocks.  They measure 9 metres by 7.2 metres and have three windows.

You don’t have to demolish them.  Just use them as store-rooms, or whatever.  But go away and build us some classrooms.

So we did.  And two staff houses, and toilet blocks, and a laboratory, and dormitories.  All in accordance with the officially recognised plans.

Those aren’t students.  You can’t be a student in a secondary school if you’re wearing Maasai robes.  Make them all buy shirts and trousers, or skirts if they’re girls.

Ouch.  That one hurt.  We thought about giving up at that point.  But we knew school would come to the village sooner or later.  We figured it was better to have one that honoured the Maasai traditions as best it could, and showed young people the power and the beauty of indigenous knowledge by bringing Masters and PhD students from overseas to study it… and let them wear their robes on special occasions, if they wanted to.  (Some of them didn’t, which was also fine…)

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I won’t say it was all 100% benefit and no costs.  Nothing in life ever is.  But since our first graduation in 2008, more than 300 students – most of them from low-income families who’d never have been able to afford an education – have graduated from Noonkodin Secondary School with a Form 4 certificate – the equivalent of GCSE or tenth grade.

Many of them are now teachers, nurses or business owners.  And one is the Headmaster.

So if you have a dream, however wild and crazy, don’t let anyone put you down.  Don’t let anyone tell you that it’s too much, or that you’re not enough.

You are enough.

We are ALL enough.

We are big enough, smart enough, brave enough… even when we aren’t feeling it.

In this week’s blog series, I’ll be sharing my own insights about how to face your fears.  I’ll introduce you to Daman, the crazy dreamer from my new novel The Nineteen Songs of Reunion, who’s all fired up about crossing the Irish Sea with a lighted lantern to win the patronage of the King… and to Brianna, the heroine of the story, whose spark becomes a flame when she falls in love with Daman and discovers new dreams of her own.

And I’ll be telling you about my new crazy dream, which you can join in- a powerful initiation for Summer Solstice, held at the ancient sacred site of Aquae Sulis (Bath Spa), to help women awaken the fearless Goddess within and start living those dreams!

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